Monty Hall dead: Winnipeg-born host of ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ dies at 96 —

Hall co-created “Let’s Make a Deal,” which debuted on NBC in 1963 and became a TV staple for decades.

via Monty Hall dead: Winnipeg-born host of ‘Let’s Make a Deal’ dies at 96 —

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Former “Let’s Make a Deal” host Monty Hall has died. He was 96.

Sharon Hall says her father died Saturday morning of heart failure at his home in Beverly Hills, California.

Hall co-created “Let’s Make a Deal,” which debuted on NBC in 1963 and became a TV staple for decades.

Contestants chosen from the studio audience wore outlandish costumes to attract Hall’s attention. The game involved swapping prize items for others hidden behind doors, curtains or in boxes, leading to the famous question: Do you want Door No. 1, No. 2 or No. 3?”

His daughter says Hall, who was born in Canada, enjoyed his fame and never turned down an autograph or a chance to use his name to help others.

She estimates he raised nearly $1 billion for charity over his lifetime.

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No, HBO Is Not Selling Bill Maher’s Blue “We’re Still Here” Baseball Caps — Deadline

Looks like the Trump election is going to open up at least one small-business opportunity: HBO has no plans to manufacture or sell those royal blue “We’re Still Here” ball caps unveiled on Real Time With Bill Maher last night. Contacted by Deadline this morning, HBO spokespersons said they knew of no plans to expand into…

via No, HBO Is Not Selling Bill Maher’s Blue “We’re Still Here” Baseball Caps — Deadline

“Hot Bench” – Judge Judy’s New Show Is Eye-Opening!

thelegalreformer

Judge Judy Sheindlin (a/k/a Judge Judy) has developed a new legal show titled Hot Bench, and according to a March 31, 2015 New York Times article (courtesy of Yahoo! Finance), “it’s a surprise hit.”  Debuting in 2014, it’s already topping the charts as the No. 1 syndicated show.

The premise: a three judge panel hears civil cases and then retires to deliberate . . . all on camera.  The panel: former New York State Supreme Court justice Patricia DiMango, Yale Law litigator Tanya Acker, and criminal defense attorney Larry M. Bakman.  The viewer watches the deliberations and how each judge views the evidence and the witnesses.

images-2 Judge Judy Sheindlin courtesy of wikipedia.org

The show is eye-opening in that the viewer can see for themselves that different judges view evidence and witness veracity differently. The show illustrates the truism that justice actually isn’t blind.

‘People rely too much on the judicial system…

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